Posts Tagged ‘Branding’

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Consumption

January 31, 2007

Got a few people coming in to the blog recently from this link on the blog of my former colleague at Microsoft Gianpaolo Carraro (known as GP). We had been discussing the use of the term “consumption” as a way to describe how services are “used” in a Software as a Service (SaaS) architecture. I suggested that the negative connotations of the word “consumption” outweighed the correctness of its usage.

GP and I had a good back and forth over that, and his perspective was illuminating. Given that fact that he is not a native English speaker (but is an outstanding one) and speaks at least two other languages he attacked the problem from a different place than I did. I suspect my extreme sensitivity to the subtleties of the word was driving my argument.

The fact is that I think paying careful attention to the words we use in product naming, marketing, etc. is critical and an often overlooked aspect of positioning. Although many people today might not known the various historical and linguistic underpinnings of a word like “consumption” there is still something ingrained into the fabric of our language that can cause a bit of delay in comprehension or a bit of lingering affect that we really don’t want.

Please consume my blog at your own risk.

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Trader Joe’s & Whole Foods

November 14, 2005

Trader Joe’s & Whole Foods

This is an appreciation of these two fine stores, from the perspective of both marketer and consumer.

I could buy 90% of all I need in the food/household supplies categories at these two stores. I would need to stop by the chain supermarket or Target for some things like batteries, medicine, cat litter, etc. I also get some nice organic produce delivered to the house every other week by Pioneer Organics.

Whole Foods appeals based on purity, excitement, goodness, wonder, fantasy, light, and air.

Trader Joe’s appeals based on value, variety, humor, practicality, and the feeling of the bazaar.

When you visit WF you enter a world of sunlight, green fields, and endless optimism. The experience they provide is different from almost any other grocery store. The ceilings stretch upwards and the aisles beckon. The corners are clean and the air smells fresh. Compare any one of these to your standard grocery store, or even your local “high end” grocery store, and you see the difference. It always comes back to the light for me. Being in a WF is like being outside. Everything glows. The pleasure comes in the abundance, the tastes, the purity, and the sense of a better world. This is shopping for the soul.

The experience is almost the exact opposite at TJs. The stores are small, narrow, and cramped with food and people. The ceilings are low and the air is compressed around me. It is a scramble to find all the goodies and then get in line. But the joy is in the hunt, the bargains, and the feeling of being in another country altogether. This is shopping for the mind.

I spend too much money at both of these stores, but can’t really get enough.

Visit one or both today. Enjoy the theater of it all.

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Marketing wisdom

April 22, 2005

Having so little time lately, and when I have some spare time I devote to my family, I present some interesting reading. Perhaps I will comment on it in the future:

BrandChannel

BrandWeek

MarketingProfs

Sometimes we all feel overwhelmed by the amount of informaiton that is pushed into our head on a daily basis. It is difficult enough just keeping the days of the week straight, nonetheless having to worry about the Pope, the President, the Food Pyramids, and the fact that Paula claims not to be drunnk.

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